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Year 4

Topic Letters 2016-17

Term 1 – Living Together

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / topic related ideas

Science

Animals including humans:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
  • construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.

Thinking Scientifically:

  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings

 

 

Geography

Locational knowledge

  • locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities
  • name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  •  use the eight points of a compass, grid references, symbols and key to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
  • use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Compare Dartford to a town / city in North / South America

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start with basic grid reference e.g C5

History

  • a local history study

 

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Related to country comparing to in America – explore art from that country. Try different forms of art – printing, painting on ceramic or glass, mosaic

Computing

  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  •  use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact

Link up / email / skype with an American school

Citizenship

  • To talk about and write their opinions, and explain their views, on issues that affect themselves and society.
  • To research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and events.

 

 

 

Term 2 – Temples, Tombs and Treasures

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / topic related ideas

Science

Light:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light
  • notice that light is reflected from surfaces
  • recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes
  • recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object
  • find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.

Thinking scientifically:

  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

 

 

History

  • They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

 

Pupils should be taught about:

  • the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of Ancient Egypt.

 

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]

about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Egyptian art – using style with flat colours

Clay – Canopic jars – building on from clay in year 3 – glazing and adding details with tools rather than painting

 

Term 3 – Active Planet

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / topic related ideas

Science

Rocks:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties
  • recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter
  • describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock

Thinking scientifically:

  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes

 

DT

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups

 generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work

 

 

Geography

Place knowledge

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America Human and physical geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • physical geography, including: mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes
  •  human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

 

 

Citizenship

  • To know what makes a healthy lifestyle, including the benefits of regular exercise and healthy eating, what affects mental health and how to make informed choices.
  •  

 

 

Term 4 – Chocolate

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / topic related ideas

Science

Revise materials from year 3 but mostly focus on thinking scientifically.

Thinking scientifically:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  •  gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings

 

What is the best wrppaer for a chocolate bar?

Can you taste  chocolate if you can smell garlic etc?

Geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

 

 

Fair trade, food miles

DT

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
  •  generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches.

 Make

  • select from and use a wider range of ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work

 

 

Computing

  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data

 

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing,

Graphic drawing, designing a wrapper

 

Term 5 – How Humans Work

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / topic related ideas

Science

Animals including humans:

  • identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
  •  describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans
  •  identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions

Thinking scientifically:

  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes

 

DT

Cooking and nutrition:

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques

understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]

about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Sketching – portraits – look at different shading techniques with pencils and charcoal – in sketch books

Look at Picasso portraits and Andy Warhol Marylin Monroe (do as collage or screen printing)

Citizenship

  • To take responsibility (e.g. for planning and looking after school environment; for the needs of others, such as acting as a peer supporter, or as a playground mediator for younger children).

 

 

 

Term 6 – Inventions that changed the world

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / topic related ideas

Science

Sound:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating
  • recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear
  •  find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  •  find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  •  recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

Thinking scientifically:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables

 

DT

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world

 

 

History

  • Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Pupils should be taught about:

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupil’s knowledge beyond 1066 e.g changes in an aspect of social history like leisure and entertainment in the 20th century

 

Computing

  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  •  select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information

 

 

 

 

Music, PE – covered in PPA year 3+4, French, RE, PSHE – to be taught weekly

Subject

IPC Topic

Science

Thinking scientifically:

During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings

Rocks:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties
  • recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter

Animals including humans:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
  • identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
  •  describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans
  •  identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions
  •  construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.

Light:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light
  • notice that light is reflected from surfaces
  • recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes
  • recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object
  • find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.

Sound:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating
  • recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear
  •  find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  •  find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  •  recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

 

 

Throughout the year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active planet

 

 

 

 

How humans work

 

 

 

 

 

How humans work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How humans work

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

 

Throughout various topics

 

Design and technology

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
  •  generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

 Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately
  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world

Technical knowledge

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures
  •  understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages]
  •  understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors]
  •  apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Cooking and nutrition:

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques
  • understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Active planet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How humans work

Geography:

Pupils should extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the United Kingdom and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They should develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge. Pupils should be taught to:

Locational knowledge

  • locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities
  • name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time
  •  identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Place knowledge

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America Human and physical geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle
  •  human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied
  •  use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
  • use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Living together

History

  • Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Pupils should be taught about:

  • the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China

 

  • a local history study

 

Temples, tombs and treasure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Living together

Music:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  •  improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  •  listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  •  appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

Active planet

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