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Year 5

Topic Letters 2016-17

Term 1 – The Great, The Bold and The Brave

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance/ Topic related ideas

Science

Thinking scientifically

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

 

Something topic based – testing materials for roman armour??

DT

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces

Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately
  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work

 

Make  something involving tools and wood – catapults?– like the Romans may have fought with.

History

  • They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.
  • They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.

Pupils should be taught about:

  • the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain
  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

 

Less to cover than last year – so more time to go into the Romans in more detail

Computing

  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  •  select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact

Present information on PowerPoint including hyperlinks and Prezi and other software

Citizenship

  • To realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours, such as bullying and racism, on individuals and communities.
  • To develop relationships through work and play (e.g. taking part in activities with groups that have particular needs, such as children with special needs, and the elderly; communicating with children from other countries by satellite, email or letters).

 

 

 

 

Term 2 – What a Wonderful World

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / Topic related ideas

Science

Electricity:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit
  •  compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches
  • use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram.

Thinking scientifically

  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

 

Relate to topic by discussing environmentally friendly forms of energy – hydropower, wind turbines etc

Geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • physical geography, including: Rivers

Locational knowledge

  • locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities

Place knowledge

  • understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America Human and physical geography

 

Learn about River features and formation in detail

 

Focus on a different environment  and the issues it faces.

 

Choose one particular environment (NOT the Brazilian rainforest as that is covered in year 3) and compare to an environment in the UK

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Landscape painting and drawing

VanGogh

Music

Music:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  •  improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music

 

 

 

Term 3 – Being Human

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / Topic related ideas

Science

Animals including humans:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood
  • recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function
  • describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans.

Thinking scientifically

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs

 

Citzenship

 

 

DT

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches

Make

  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work

 

Sewing – making / customising an item of clothing?

Music

Music:

  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  •  appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing,

 

Sketching people moving – athletes – look at how to draw bodies

 

Term 4 – Making New Materials

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / Topic related ideas

Science

Properties and changes of materials:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets
  • know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution
  • use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating
  • give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic
  •  demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes
  •  explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.

Thinking scientifically

During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

 

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Watercolours – building on from lower KS1 – basic colour wash and adding details

Reflection in water pictures

 

Mixed media pictures (new materials link) – using a range of materials - collage

Geography

Locational knowledge

  • name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

fieldwork

  • use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Erosion and rivers / coast – making new materials

 

Look locally at river – could map the river Darent or enchanted woodland

Computing

Pupils should be taught to:

  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information

 

Excel – creating graphs and tables

 

Term 5 – Champions for Change

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / Topic related ideas

Science

Thinking scientifically

  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

 

More using research to answer questions, is the information reliable? – relating it to political information that may be biased.

History

  • Pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Pupils should be taught about:

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupil’s knowledge beyond 1066 e.g. the changing power of monarchs

 

Look at power of monarchs and how this has changed over the years as we have become more democratic

 

Examples could be John, Anne, Victoria, Henry VIII

Music

Music:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.

 

Citizenship

  • To recognise, as they approach puberty, how people’s emotions change at that time and how to deal with their feelings towards themselves, their family and others in a positive way.

 

 

Art

Pupils should be taught:

  • to create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • about great artists, architects and designers in history.

Design in sketch books

Banksy – stencils and spray paint

 

Term 6 – Fairgrounds

Subject

NC objective (statutory coverage)

Guidance / Topic related ideas

Science

Forces:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object
  • identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces
  •  recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect.

Thinking scientifically

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs

 

DT

Technical knowledge

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures
  •  understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages]
  •  understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors]
  •  apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

 

Make – something for fairground involving electrical component (fairground game with buzzers or flashing lights?)

Geography

Describe and understand key aspects of:

  • human geography, including: types of settlement and land use

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Look at where to build a new fairground nearby – decide on site and create a map.

 

Begin to try and use scales when map drawing (moving on from year 3+4)

 

PE taught through providers in PPA

French, RE and PSHE to be taught discretely

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